Monthly Archives: December 2019

New study shows global biases toward members of the LGBTQ community

Photo courtesy: Unsplash/Mahrealist A new study from researchers at New York University – Abu Dhabi suggests negative attitudes toward members of the LGBTQ community is, in large part, due to the perception they violate traditional gender norms. According to study authors Maria Laura Bettinsoli, Alexandra Suppes, and Jamie Napier, the paper reveals three key findings: 1) Gay men are disliked more

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5 great reads for young critical thinkers

An image from the book cover for ‘SLAY,’ one of the top 2019 five books for young critical thinkers. (Simon and Schuster) This article was written byHeba Elsherief, L’Université d’Ottawa/University of Ottawa At this time of year, “best of” lists abound, vying for our attention. But teachers and parents committed to principles of social justice are generally left searching for

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"Boys clubs" are still keeping minorities out of leadership roles, study finds

Image courtesy: Canva. “Old boys’ clubs” — a moniker used to describe social advantages men have over women in professional settings — could be responsible for a third of the corporate gender gap, according to a new study by Zoe Cullen of Harvard Business School and Ricardo Perez-Truglia of UCLA. “We find that when male employees are assigned to male managers, they

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It will take 99.5 years to close the global gender gap, according to new survey

Image courtesy: World Economic Forum It will take 99.5 years to close the gender gap in health, education, work, and political sectors, according to a new Global Gender Gap Report by the World Economic Forum.  The assessment is nearly a decade better than 2018’s estimate, which calculated it would take 108 years to reach global parity. The improved outlook is attributed to an

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See it, be it: Mentoring strengthens a student's commitment, study finds

Photo courtesy: Pexels/Christina Morillo. Edited by We Rep STEM. Students paired with professional mentors are more likely to gain a deep understanding and passion for their work, according to new research led by Consuelo Waight, associate professor of human development at the University of Houston. “By taking the students outside the classroom, they saw the relevance and meaningfulness of what they were

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How can we make sure that algorithms are fair?

Karthik Kannan, Purdue University. Photo courtesy: Pixabay. Using machines to augment human activity is nothing new. Egyptian hieroglyphs show the use of horse-drawn carriages even before 300 B.C. Ancient Indian literature such as “Silapadikaram” has described animals being used for farming. And one glance outside shows that today people use motorized vehicles to get around. Where in the past human

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Male scientists more likely to describe their work as "unprecedented" or "groundbreaking" than females

Thumbnail image edited by We Rep Stem. Scientist photo courtesy of Unsplash/the CDC.  appearing in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. “Citations are often used to gauge a researcher’s influence so may have important implications for career progress,” lead author Marc J. Lerchenmueller and his team said in a statement. “Women remain underrepresented in academic medicine and the life sciences. They

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